Food Sources and Dietary Intakes

The Second National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES II) has been extensively evaluated to determine dietary sources of vitamin E in the United States. Major food groups contribute the following percentages of total vitamin E fats and oils, 20.2 vegetables, 15.1 meat, poultry, and fish, 12.6 desserts, 9.9 breakfast cereals, 9.3 fruit, 5.3 dairy products, 4.5 mixed main dishes, 4.0 nuts and seeds, 3.8 soups, sauces, and gravies, 1.7 (1, 33). Data in Table 2.3 reported as mg a-TE...

References

Institute of Medicine. Dietary Reference Intakes for Vitamin C, Vitamin E, Selenium, and Carotenoids National Academy of Sciences Press Washington, DC, 2000 186-283. 2. Traber, M.G. Vitamin E. In Modern Nutrition in Health and Disease, 9th Ed. Shils, M.E., Olson, J.A., Shike, M., Ross, A.C., Eds. William and Wilkins Baltimore, 1999 347-362. 3. Frei, B. Traber, M.G. The new US dietary reference intakes for vitamins C and E. Redox Report 2001, 6, 5-9. 4. Bramley, P.M....

Info

A-T in tuber lowest at zero time storage a-T level fourfold increase during storage no significant differences between two storage temperatures With MAP no improvement in vitamin E retention, decrease after 6 days in all treatments Rate of a-T loss highest in freeze-thaw dehydrated redgram dhal, followed by flaked

Biochemistry Of Vitamin E

Homogentisic Acid

All 6-hydroxychromanols that constitute the vitamin E family are plant products of well-defined biosynthetic routes. All photosynthetic organisms synthesize the vitamin. Synthesis has not been documented in any other organisms, and plant products provide the only natural dietary sources. Early studies concluded that a-T is formed in both photosynthetic and nonphotosynthetic tissue of higher plants, concentrated in the chloroplasts (51-52). Other tocopherols and tocotrienols are in higher...

Nutrition and Health Implications of Vitamin E

Extend Uml

With publication of the Dietary Reference Intakes (DRI) for vitamin E by the Food and Nutrition Board, National Institute of Medicine (1), recommended intakes for vitamin E now are based on the 2R-stereoisomeric forms of -tocopherol ( -T). Other forms including the 2S-stereoisomers present in synthetic all-rac- -T preparations and other tocopherols and tocotrienols in foods do not contribute to the intake requirement. Although sound scientific evidence backs the decision of the Panel on Dietary...

Editorial Board

Owen R.Fennema University of Wisconsin-Madison Y.H.Hui Science Technology System Marcus Karel Rutgers University (emeritus) Pieter Walstra Wageningen University John R.Whitaker University of California-Davis Additives P.Michael Davidson University of Tennessee-Knoxville Dairy science James L.Steele University of Wisconsin-Madison Flavor chemistry and sensory analysis John H.Thorngate III University of California-Davis Food engineering Daryl B.Lund University of Wisconsin-Madison Food lipids and...