The T Wave

The T wave corresponds to repolarization of the ventricles. It is normally inscribed in the same direction as the predominant deflection of the QRS, and has less amplitude than the QRS. Abnormalities of the T wave predominantly take the form of inversion (being inscribed in the opposite direction of the QRS), as we have seen in BBB, left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH), and AMI. They may also take the form of very large or small amplitudes, such as in hyperkalemia and hypokalemia (Figure 2.9).

Figure 2.9. Extremely tall, pointed T waves seen with hyperkalemia.

A Word About Nonspecific ST and T Wave Changes 11

A Word About Nonspecific ST and T Wave Changes 11

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Figure 2.10. Graph plotting normal QT interval against heart rate for men, women, and children,

Heart rate

Figure 2.10. Graph plotting normal QT interval against heart rate for men, women, and children,

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