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FIGURE 1.4 Smears of intestinal epithelium of a cat 7 days after feeding tissue cysts (Giemsa stain).

(A) Note different sizes of merozoites (a-c), schizont with three nuclei (d), schizont with six or more nuclei and merozoites budding from the surface (e), and a multinucleated schizont (f).

(B) Four biflagellated microgametes (arrows) and merozoites (arrowhead) for size comparision.

This figure is reproduced in color in the color plate section.

FIGURE 1.4 Smears of intestinal epithelium of a cat 7 days after feeding tissue cysts (Giemsa stain).

(A) Note different sizes of merozoites (a-c), schizont with three nuclei (d), schizont with six or more nuclei and merozoites budding from the surface (e), and a multinucleated schizont (f).

(B) Four biflagellated microgametes (arrows) and merozoites (arrowhead) for size comparision.

This figure is reproduced in color in the color plate section.

coccidian parasites. These stages were distinguished morphologically from tachyzoites (Figure 1.3D) and bradyzoites, which also occur in cat intestine. The challenge was to distinguish different stages in the cat intestine, because there was profuse multiplication of T. gondii 3 days post-infection (Figure 1.4A). The entire cycle was completed by 66 hours after feeding tissue cysts to cats (Dubey and Frenkel, 1972). There are reports on the ultrastructure of schizonts (Sheffield, 1970; Piekarski et al., 1971; Ferguson et al., 1974), gamonts (Ferguson et al., 1974, 1975; Speer and Dubey, 2005), and oocysts and sporozoites (Christie et al., 1978; Ferguson et al., 1979a, 1979b; Speer et al., 1998). In 2005, Speer and

Dubey described the ultrastructure of asexual enteroepithelial types B through E and distinguished their merozoites.

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