Epidemiology Incidence

V. parahaemolyticus is the most commonly isolated noncholera vibrio. In Japan, it has traditionally been implicated as the cause of at least one-fourth of food-borne disease cases.16 After having shown a decreasing trend in recent years,

V parahaemolyticus cases started to increase again around 1994 in Japan. Between 1996 and 1998, the number of cases more than doubled, with 12,346 cases in 850 incidents reported in 1998; this increase appears to be linked with the appearance of the new clonal group of pandemic V parahaemolyticus strains in serogroups O3:K6, O4:K68, O1:K25, and O1:KUT.34 Diarrheal cases attributed to strains in these groups have also been rapidly increasing in Bangladesh, India, Taiwan, and other southeast Asian countries since 1996, as well as in the United States.34-38

Table 22-1 Vibrio Species Implicated as Causes of Human Disease and Number of Deaths Associated with Infection with These Species

Clinical Presentation

Table 22-1 Vibrio Species Implicated as Causes of Human Disease and Number of Deaths Associated with Infection with These Species

Vibrio Species

Gastroenteritis

Wound or Ear Infection

Septicemia

No. of Cases (No.

V. cholerae

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